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Soil Problems and Solutions

Compacted Soil

Not only does soil compaction reduce the structural integrity of your dirt, it prevents adequate water penetration. It is often caused by constant pressure over the years from heavy objects like sheds, playgrounds, and concrete patios, as well as, repetitive foot traffic and motor vehicles. To relieve this problem, increase the frequency of hollow tine aeration. If your case is severe, you may need to rip up the soil. Once you have a new foundation of fresh quality top soil to work with, consider installing pavers or flagstones to relieve heavy traffic.

Hard-to-Dig Soil

Extremely hard soil is very difficult to cultivate. If you can’t dig up enough to create a suitable hole for planting, you can’t plant anything at all. To help ease the struggle of hard-to-dig dirt, you may need to have a secondary irrigation water stubbed into the yard, followed by installing a temporary hose bib into the stubbed secondary water. If this is not possible, culinary water practices may be your best option to moisten soil.

Rocky Soil

The only thing worse than soil that is too hard or compact is soil with too many rocks. Although suitable for plants and trees, it can be very hard to work with. Digging, cultivating, and more are all made more difficult when there is a presence of excess rocks and gravel. TO help this problem, you can choose to use raised garden beds or add a new level of fresh top soil (at least 6 inches for best results).