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Types of Weeds Grow

One very special characteristics of weeds is that they grow vigorously. They have the ability for rapid growth, sending strong root systems far into the ground and reproduce at a very fast pace. They also have very high survival rate. They crowd out the cultivated plants and rob them of essential nutrients, water, sunlight, and space.

For this reason, weed control and elimination are major lawn care tasks for many landscapers. To get rid of these weeds in your garden or lawn, it greatly helps to know and understand how they grow.

What are common types of weeds and how do they grow?

  1. Chickweed

Chickweed plants are famous travelers and they are very persistent. They are active all year-round. Generally, they love make themselves at home in the tropics and in cold climates. However, even during autumn when most weeds are blackened by frost, they are still fresh and green. Their seeds sprout and their star-shaped flowers open even during winter.

  1. Bindweed

This kind of weed is a close relative of the morning glory. Bindweed plants have the ability to twist their stem around and around until they have climbed to the top of a larger plant.

  1. Poison Ivy

This plant is famous clinging vine with roots growing from its stem. These roots allow them to cling to a stone wall or the bark of a tree.

  1. Dodder

This is the most dangerous kind of weed to have. If left to themselves, they will kill your plants and take over your garden.

Since they have no leaves and lack green coloring matter, they are unable to make their own food. In order to survive, they curl around another plant with their orange-yellow stem and get nourishment from the plant they grow on using their special sucker-like roots.

  1. Creeping weeds

Many types of weeds work underground. Some of them survive even during dry spells because they have long, thick taproots that enable them to get water. This includes dandelions, burdock, evening primrose, and broad-leafed plantain.